A heat shield for electronics just 10 atoms thick

Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact. Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme

A heat shield for electronics just 10 atoms thick

Can puffy pink seaweed stop cows from burping methane?

A puffy pink seaweed that can stop cows from burping out methane is being primed for mass farming by USC researchers. The University’s Seaweed Research Group leader Associate Professor Nick Paul said that if Australia could grow enough of the seaweed for every cow in Australia, the country could cut its greenhouse gas emissions by

Can puffy pink seaweed stop cows from burping methane?

The science of the energy transition: Macro-energy systems

What types of electricity storage could have the biggest impact globally for a low-carbon energy future? Can humanity simultaneously de-carbonize energy and extend heat, lighting and transportation to more than a billion people now living with without modern energy services? These are the types of big-picture questions that are being answered by the research that

The science of the energy transition: Macro-energy systems

Attacking citrus greening with a new approach

Finding a treatment for a devastating, incurable citrus disease was personal for Sharon Long and Melanie Barnett. Now, a system they developed could provide clues to a cure. Over the course of 40 years, biologist Sharon Long has become an expert in symbiotic bacteria that help alfalfa grow. She has published over 150 papers on this one

Attacking citrus greening with a new approach

Revolutionizing how light is harnessed for solar energy use

Researchers develop new design rule for generating excitons will help advance next-generation devices Researchers at Columbia University have developed a way to harness more power from singlet fission to increase the efficiency of solar cells, providing a tool to help push forward the development of next-generation devices. In a study published this month in Nature Chemistry,

Revolutionizing how light is harnessed for solar energy use

First flight of ROBOpilot demonstrates a new flight capability

The Air Force Research Laboratory and DZYNE Technologies Incorporated successfully completed a two-hour initial flight of a revolutionary Robotic Pilot Unmanned Conversion Program called ROBOpilot Aug. 9 at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah. “This flight test is a testament to AFRL’s ability to rapidly innovate technology from concept to application in a safe build up

First flight of ROBOpilot demonstrates a new flight capability

Now you can sweat it and have your sweat monitored

Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what’s in your sweat. They hope that one day, monitoring perspiration could bypass the need for more invasive procedures like blood draws, and provide real-time updates on health problems such as dehydration

Now you can sweat it and have your sweat monitored

A global spike in atmospheric methane is due to fracking

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth’s atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. The research suggests that this methane has less carbon-13 relative to carbon-12 (denoting the weight of the carbon atom at the

A global spike in atmospheric methane is due to fracking

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