A new inflammation inhibitor has been discovered

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science and was done in collaboration with the University of

A new inflammation inhibitor has been discovered

Can your smart phone determine if you’re having the most serious – and deadly – form of heart attack?

Study Finds Phone App Effectively Identifies Potentially Fatal Heart Attacks with the Near Accuracy of a Standard ECG A new research study says it can – and may be a valuable tool to save lives. The international study, led by researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, found that a

Can your smart phone determine if you’re having the most serious – and deadly – form of heart attack?

Thanatin, an insect antibiotic, provides a new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics. The global emergence of

Thanatin, an insect antibiotic, provides a new way to eliminate bacteria

New discovery could have profound implications for the treatment of autoimmunity and cancer

From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges In 2013, renowned Boston Children’s Hospital pain researcher Clifford Woolf, MB, BCh, PhD, and chemist Kai Johnsson, PhD, his fellow co-founder at Quartet Medicine, believed they held the key to non-narcotic pain relief. Woolf had shown that tetrahydrobioptrin — a protein also known as

New discovery could have profound implications for the treatment of autoimmunity and cancer

What’s next for smart homes: An Internet of Ears?

Next generation of connected buildings envisions using changes in vibrations, sound and electrical field to improve energy consumption, monitor occupants’ movements Houses have been getting progressively “smarter” for decades, but the next generation of smart homes may offer what two Case Western Reserve University scientists are calling an “Internet of Ears.” Today’s smart home features

What’s next for smart homes: An Internet of Ears?

Using body heat to power wearables

If thermoelectric materials can convert low-grade heat into electricity, we may never need to charge wearable technology at home again. At night, most of us plug in a jumble of wires and devices as we charge our smart watches, phones and fitness trackers. It’s a pile that’s unlikely to get any smaller as more and

Using body heat to power wearables

Hybrid-intelligence interfaces optimally exploit the best of human and machine intelligence

Researchers developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed external experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world through multiplayer collaboration and in real time to optimize a quantum gas experiment in a lab at Aarhus University. Surprisingly, both teams quickly used the interface to dramatically improve upon the previous best

Hybrid-intelligence interfaces optimally exploit the best of human and machine intelligence

Fighting infection and helping wounds heal fast using a new microgel powder

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99 percent. Hao Meng’s doctoral project focused on biocompatibility testing and pulling a sticky amino acid out of mussels. Glue-like catechol shows promise for smart adhesives — a

Fighting infection and helping wounds heal fast using a new microgel powder

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense food contamination

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense contamination. MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense food contamination

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles Restoring the United States’ lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles

Fusion power pushes past 100 million degrees

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), nicknamed the “Chinese artificial sun”, achieved an electron temperature of over 100 million degrees in its core plasma during a four-month experiment this year. That’s about seven times more than the interior of the Sun, which is about 15 million degrees C. The experiment shows China is making significant

Fusion power pushes past 100 million degrees

A blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined “liquid biopsy,” epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings, published online today in Nature, describe not only a way to detect cancer, but hold promise

A blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages

Faces of Discovery

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