The drastic rise of antimicrobial resistance in animals in low and middle income countries

An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries. They produced the first global of resistance rates, and identified regions where interventions are urgently needed. The world is experiencing unprecedented economic growth in low- and middle-income countries. An increasing number

The drastic rise of antimicrobial resistance in animals in low and middle income countries

Is the next agricultural revolution really here?

As a growing population and climate change threaten food security, researchers around the world are working to overcome the challenges that threaten the dietary needs of humans and livestock. A pair of scientists is now making the case that the knowledge and tools exist to facilitate the next agricultural revolution we so desperately need. Cold

Is the next agricultural revolution really here?

Monitoring heart failure with a medical monitoring bathroom scale

“Good morning. Bill. Please. Step onto the scale. Touch the metal pads.” The device records an electrocardiogram from Bill’s fingers and – more importantly – circulation pulsing that makes his body subtly bob up and down on the scale. Machine learning tools compute that Bill’s heart failure symptoms have worsened. This is how researchers at

Monitoring heart failure with a medical monitoring bathroom scale

Is the evolution of learning key to the evolution of artificial intelligence?

Since “2001: A Space Odyssey,” people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence? Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same

Is the evolution of learning key to the evolution of artificial intelligence?

Better repair of sun and age-damaged skin?

In the future, you could be your very own fountain of youth – or at least your own skin repair reservoir. In a proof-of-concept study, researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that exosomes harvested from human skin cells are more effective at repairing sun-damaged skin cells in mice than popular retinol or stem

Better repair of sun and age-damaged skin?

A key advance towards long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing

To process information, photons must interact.  However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency — a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing,

A key advance towards long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing

Short-lived solar panels can be economically viable

Research shows that, contrary to accepted rule of thumb, a 10- or 15-year lifetime can be good enough. A new study shows that, contrary to widespread belief within the solar power industry, new kinds of solar cells and panels don’t necessarily have to last for 25 to 30 years in order to be economically viable

Short-lived solar panels can be economically viable

Reversing baldness with electric tech

Few things on earth strike fear into the hearts of men more profoundly than hair loss. But reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. “I think this will be a very practical solution to hair regeneration,” says Xudong

Reversing baldness with electric tech

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