3D-printed supercapacitor electrode could lead to wider use of fast-charging energy storage devices

Advances in supercapacitor technology could lead to wider use of fast-charging energy storage devices and novel designs for electronic gadgets Scientists at UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have reported unprecedented performance results for a supercapacitor electrode. The researchers fabricated electrodes using a printable graphene aerogel to build a porous three-dimensional scaffold

3D-printed supercapacitor electrode could lead to wider use of fast-charging energy storage devices

First proof that quantum computers do indeed offer advantages over conventional computers

Quantum computers promise to revolutionize the future of computing. A scientist from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) together with his colleagues from the University of Waterloo and from IBM have now demonstrated for the first time that quantum computers do indeed offer advantages over conventional computers. For many years, quantum computers were not much

First proof that quantum computers do indeed offer advantages over conventional computers

The plant hormone strigolactone could make space farming possible

With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists from the University of Zurich have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants’ growth – even under the challenging conditions

The plant hormone strigolactone could make space farming possible

Cheaper renewable electricity with a new material and manufacturing process that uses the sun’s heat

Solar power accounts for less than 2 percent of U.S. electricity but could make up more than that if the cost of electricity generation and energy storage for use on cloudy days and at nighttime were cheaper. A Purdue University-led team developed a new material and manufacturing process that would make one way to use solar power

Cheaper renewable electricity with a new material and manufacturing process that uses the sun’s heat

Lithium-sulfur battery evolution

In late July of 2008 a British solar plane set an unofficial flight-endurance record by remaining aloft for more than three days straight. Lithium-sulfur batteries emerged as one of the great technological advances that enabled the flight —powering the plane overnight with efficiency unmatched by the top batteries of the day. Ten years later, the

Lithium-sulfur battery evolution

Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate

Stanford researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called “Becoming Homeless,” were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants. A Stanford-developed virtual reality experience, called “Becoming Homeless,” is helping expand research on how this new immersive technology affects people’s level

Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate

Making gene therapy more effective using RNA could offer improved safety and easier delivery

Biological engineers design RNA circuits that enable precise control over the dose of therapeutic protein a patient receives. Delivering functional genes into cells to replace mutated genes, an approach known as gene therapy, holds potential for treating many types of diseases. The earliest efforts to deliver genes to diseased cells focused on DNA, but many

Making gene therapy more effective using RNA could offer improved safety and easier delivery

First-ever microelectromechanical neural network application using a reservoir computer

Researchers used oscillations from a microscopic beam of silicon to enable the nonlinear dynamics that allow neural networks to complete tasks ranging from processing image patterns to recognizing words. As artificial intelligence has become increasingly sophisticated, it has inspired renewed efforts to develop computers whose physical architecture mimics the human brain. One approach, called reservoir

First-ever microelectromechanical neural network application using a reservoir computer

A new method to address deep-seated biases in science

New UMBC research is helping dismantle gender and publication biases in science. A team of researchers working across disciplines has developed a new statistical technique to understand similarity, rather than difference, in the natural world. With this new technique, they’ve determined that among Eastern Bluebirds the structure of songs female birds sing is statistically indistinguishable

A new method to address deep-seated biases in science

Wearable artificial kidney gains FDA fast-track status

There just aren’t enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nanoa new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a

Wearable artificial kidney gains FDA fast-track status

Breakthrough: The first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue

A tissue-like material capable of synchronised beating when heated and cooled has been developed by a team of University of Bristol chemists. The discovery, published in Nature Materials, is the first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue. The findings, which could have major health applications in the future, could see chemically programmed synthetic tissue

Breakthrough: The first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue

A thin and flexible transparent nanoforce touch sensor for wearable electronics

Researchers reported a high-performance and transparent nanoforce touch sensor by developing a thin, flexible, and transparent hierarchical nanocomposite (HNC) film. The research team says their sensor simultaneously features all the necessary characters for industrial-grade application: high sensitivity, transparency, bending insensitivity, and manufacturability. Force touch sensors that recognize the location and pressure of external stimuli have

A thin and flexible transparent nanoforce touch sensor for wearable electronics

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