Health monitoring, food inspection and night vision based wearables made from graphene

The Graphene Pavilion, organised by the Graphene Flagship and supported by the European Commission and GSMA, is returning to Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019 with over 20 graphene-based prototypes, four of which are developed by the Graphene Flagship partner ICFO, based in Barcelona. These technologies aim to turn mobile phones into life saving devices. The first of ICFO’s

Health monitoring, food inspection and night vision based wearables made from graphene

A promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice

Elderly to feel fitter, faster and stronger Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a study just published in Biochemical Pharmacology. As we age, our bodies increasingly lose the ability to

A promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice

Antbot is the first walking robot that moves without GPS.

Human eyes are insensitive to polarized light and ultraviolet radiation, but that is not the case for ants, who use it to locate themselves in space. Cataglyphis desert ants in particular can cover several hundreds of meters in direct sunlight in the desert to find food, then return in a straight line to the nest,

Antbot is the first walking robot that moves without GPS.

A new non-toxic fire-retardant coating features renewable materials and better protection

    Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials. Dr. Jaime Grunlan, the Linda & Ralph Schmidt ’68 Professor in the J. Mike Walker ’66 Department of Mechanical Engineering

A new non-toxic fire-retardant coating features renewable materials and better protection

Reversing memory loss linked to depression and aging with new molecules

New therapeutic molecules developed at Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging. These molecules not only rapidly improve symptoms, but remarkably, also appear to renew the underlying brain impairments causing memory loss in preclinical models. These findings were presented today at the

Reversing memory loss linked to depression and aging with new molecules

Undersea carbon reservoirs are a major climate change wildcard

Undersea carbon reservoirs have caused global warming before — and it could happen again, according to research by an international team of scientists led by USC The world’s oceans could harbor an unpleasant surprise for global warming, based on new research that shows how naturally occurring carbon gases trapped in reservoirs atop the seafloor escaped

Undersea carbon reservoirs are a major climate change wildcard

To survive, US citrus may have to become genetically modified

A tiny insect, no bigger than the head of a pin, is threatening to topple the multibillion-dollar citrus industry in the U.S. by infecting millions of acres of orchards with an incurable bacterium called citrus greening disease. The battle to save the citrus industry is pitting crop producers and a team of agriculture researchers –

To survive, US citrus may have to become genetically modified

Wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment

Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. Their research has been published as the cover story in the February issue of the journal Advanced Electronic Materials. SFU professor Woo Soo Kim is leading the research team’s discovery involving the

Wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment

A DNA search engine for microbes

Researchers at EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have combined their knowledge of bacterial genetics and web search algorithms to build a DNA search engine for microbial data. The search engine, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, could enable researchers and public health agencies to use genome sequencing data to monitor the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. By

A DNA search engine for microbes

New brain blood flow findings could be a complete game-changer for people with Alzheimer’s disease

You know that dizzy feeling you get when, after lying down for an extended period, you stand up a little too quickly? That feeling is caused by a sudden reduction of blood flow to the brain, a reduction of around 30 percent. Now imagine living every minute of every day with that level of decreased

New brain blood flow findings could be a complete game-changer for people with Alzheimer’s disease

Smartphones get artificial intelligence help to diagnose disease

Accessible, connected, and computationally powerful, smartphones aren’t just for “selfies” anymore. They have emerged as powerful evaluation tools capable of diagnosing medical conditions in point-of-care settings. Smartphones also are a viable solution for health care in the developing world because they allow untrained users to collect and transmit data to medical professionals. Although smartphone camera

Smartphones get artificial intelligence help to diagnose disease

A new AI-driven platform that can analyse how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist

New AI toolkit is the ‘scientist that never sleeps’ The platform, HRMAn (‘Herman’), which stands for Host Response to Microbe Analysis, is open-source, easy-to-use and can be tailored for different pathogens including Salmonella enterica. Pioneered by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute and UCL, HRMAn uses deep neural networks to analyse complex patterns in images of pathogen and human (‘host’)

A new AI-driven platform that can analyse how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist

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