Making gene therapy more effective using RNA could offer improved safety and easier delivery

Biological engineers design RNA circuits that enable precise control over the dose of therapeutic protein a patient receives. Delivering functional genes into cells to replace mutated genes, an approach known as gene therapy, holds potential for treating many types of diseases. The earliest efforts to deliver genes to diseased cells focused on DNA, but many

Making gene therapy more effective using RNA could offer improved safety and easier delivery

First-ever microelectromechanical neural network application using a reservoir computer

Researchers used oscillations from a microscopic beam of silicon to enable the nonlinear dynamics that allow neural networks to complete tasks ranging from processing image patterns to recognizing words. As artificial intelligence has become increasingly sophisticated, it has inspired renewed efforts to develop computers whose physical architecture mimics the human brain. One approach, called reservoir

First-ever microelectromechanical neural network application using a reservoir computer

A new method to address deep-seated biases in science

New UMBC research is helping dismantle gender and publication biases in science. A team of researchers working across disciplines has developed a new statistical technique to understand similarity, rather than difference, in the natural world. With this new technique, they’ve determined that among Eastern Bluebirds the structure of songs female birds sing is statistically indistinguishable

A new method to address deep-seated biases in science

Wearable artificial kidney gains FDA fast-track status

There just aren’t enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nanoa new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a

Wearable artificial kidney gains FDA fast-track status

Breakthrough: The first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue

A tissue-like material capable of synchronised beating when heated and cooled has been developed by a team of University of Bristol chemists. The discovery, published in Nature Materials, is the first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue. The findings, which could have major health applications in the future, could see chemically programmed synthetic tissue

Breakthrough: The first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue

A thin and flexible transparent nanoforce touch sensor for wearable electronics

Researchers reported a high-performance and transparent nanoforce touch sensor by developing a thin, flexible, and transparent hierarchical nanocomposite (HNC) film. The research team says their sensor simultaneously features all the necessary characters for industrial-grade application: high sensitivity, transparency, bending insensitivity, and manufacturability. Force touch sensors that recognize the location and pressure of external stimuli have

A thin and flexible transparent nanoforce touch sensor for wearable electronics

Ultrasound levitation that bends around barriers: A world first

Researchers at the University of Sussex have become the first in the world to develop technology which can bend sound waves around an obstacle and levitate an object above it. SoundBender, developed by Professor Sriram Subramanian, Dr Gianluca Memoli and Dr Diego Martinez Plasencia at the University of Sussex, is an interface capable of producing dynamic self-bending beams that enable

Ultrasound levitation that bends around barriers: A world first

Rapid and cheap optical communication using perovskites

Researchers at the universities in Linköping and Shenzhen have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music. “It’s a promising material for future rapid optical communication”, says LiU researcher Feng Gao. “Perovskites of inorganic materials have a huge potential to influence the development

Rapid and cheap optical communication using perovskites

Big step taken to mass produce hydrogen energy

The research team of Professor Jong-Sung Yu’s has developed new photocatalyst synthesis method using Magnesium hydride (MgH2) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) A research team led by DGIST Professor Jong-Sung Yu’s team at the Department of Energy Science and Engineering has successfully developed a new catalyst synthesis method that can efficiently decompose water into oxygen and

Big step taken to mass produce hydrogen energy

The key to a computing revolution: Half-light half-matter particles

Scientists have discovered new particles that could lie at the heart of a future technological revolution based on photonic circuitry, leading to superfast, light-based computing. Current computing technology is based on electronics, where electrons are used to encode and transport information. Due to some fundamental limitations, such as energy-loss through resistive heating, it is expected

The key to a computing revolution: Half-light half-matter particles

Robotic manufacturing with a fiber composite digital fabrication system

FIBERBOTS is a digital fabrication platform fusing cooperative robotic manufacturing with abilities to generate highly sophisticated material architectures. The platform can enable design and digital fabrication of large-scale structures with high spatial resolution leveraging mobile fabrication nodes, or robotic “agents” designed to tune the material make-up of the structure being constructed on the fly as informed by

Robotic manufacturing with a fiber composite digital fabrication system

Deep neural networks could detect magnetic field anomalies for faster warnings before earthquakes and tsunamis

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have applied machine-learning techniques to achieve fast, accurate estimates of local geomagnetic fields using data taken at multiple observation points, potentially allowing detection of changes caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. A deep neural network (DNN) model was developed and trained using existing data; the result is a fast, efficient method

Deep neural networks could detect magnetic field anomalies for faster warnings before earthquakes and tsunamis

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