New algorithm predicts 2018–2022 may be an even hotter period than expected based on current global warming

This summer’s world-wide heatwave makes 2018 a particularly hot year. As will be the next few years, according to a study led by Florian Sévellec, a CNRS researcher at the Laboratory for Ocean Physics and Remote Sensing (LOPS) (CNRS/IFREMER/IRD/University of Brest) and at the University of Southampton, and published in the 14 August 2018 edition

New algorithm predicts 2018–2022 may be an even hotter period than expected based on current global warming

It’s possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells

What’s the secret to aging well? University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have answered it- on a cellular level. Aging starts in our cells, and those aging cells can hasten cellular senescence, leading to tissue dysfunction and related health impacts. New research involving University of Minnesota Medical School faculty Paul D. Robbins and Laura J. Niedernhofer,

It’s possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells

Is this a new weapon against one of the deadliest cancers?

Aggressive brain tumour cells taken from patients were found to self-destruct after being exposed by to a chemical in laboratory tests by researchers. The study could be the first step in tackling cancers such as glioblastoma, which led to Dame Tessa Jowell’s death earlier this year. The research, led by the University of Leeds, found

Is this a new weapon against one of the deadliest cancers?

Robots can significantly influence children’s opinions

A study published in Science Robotics provides an interesting insight into how robots could be used positively within society Young children are significantly more likely than adults to have their opinions and decisions influenced by robots, according to new research. The study, conducted at the University of Plymouth, compared how adults and children respond to

Robots can significantly influence children’s opinions

Supramolecular electronics open the door to new high-performance devices

Graphene and related materials hold great potential for technological applications such as electronics, sensors, and energy storage devices, among others. Thanks to their high surface sensitivity, these materials are an ideal platform to study the interplay between molecular assemblies at the nanoscale and macroscopic electrical phenomena. Researchers within the Graphene Flagship designed a molecule that

Supramolecular electronics open the door to new high-performance devices

A new type of energy storage system could revolutionise energy storage and drop the charging time of electric cars from hours to seconds

A new type of energy storage system could revolutionise energy storage and drop the charging time of electric cars from hours to seconds. In a new paper published today in the journal Nature Chemistry, chemists from the University of Glasgow discuss how they developed a flow battery system using a nano-molecule that can store electric power

A new type of energy storage system could revolutionise energy storage and drop the charging time of electric cars from hours to seconds

Could radar replace stethoscopes?

FAU researchers develop procedure for touch-free monitoring of heart sounds In conjunction with researchers at Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) in Cottbus and the Department of Palliative Medicine at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, electronic engineers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a procedure for reliably detecting and diagnosing heart sounds using radar. In future, mobile radar devices

Could radar replace stethoscopes?

Natural refrigerants could replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs in geothermal heat pumps to reduce energy consumption and operating costs

Implementing replacements of CFCs and HCFCs could help UN signatories to uphold international agreements on carbon emissions. The 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol called for countries around the world to phase out substances like CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), and HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons) that deplete the ozone layer and cause global warming. Many heating,

Natural refrigerants could replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs in geothermal heat pumps to reduce energy consumption and operating costs

3D stretchable electronics with a multitude of functions while staying thin and small

By stacking and connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft, pliable “3D stretchable electronics” that can pack a lot of functions while staying thin and small in size. The work is published in the Aug. 13 issue of Nature Electronics. As a proof of

3D stretchable electronics with a multitude of functions while staying thin and small

A low-cost method for real-time monitoring of groundwater pollutants using commonly available sensors

Berkeley Lab researchers devise system to monitor contaminant plumes Groundwater contamination is increasingly recognized as a widespread environmental problem. The most important course of action often involves long-term monitoring. But what is the most cost-effective way to monitor when the contaminant plumes are large, complex, and long-term, or an unexpected event such as a storm

A low-cost method for real-time monitoring of groundwater pollutants using commonly available sensors

Using the body’s own peptides to reduce infection and inflammation as an alternative to antibiotics

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, have in collaboration with colleagues in Copenhagen and Singapore, mapped how the body’s own peptides act to reduce infection and inflammation by deactivating the toxic substances formed in the process. The study is published in Nature Communications and the researchers believe their discovery could lead to new drugs against

Using the body’s own peptides to reduce infection and inflammation as an alternative to antibiotics

A transparent aerogel made from readily-available beer waste could insulate existing windows and more

Can a new type of transparent gel, made from readily-available beer waste, help engineers build greenhouses on Mars? CU Boulder physicists have developed an insulating gel that they say could coat the windows of habitats in space, allowing the settlers inside to trap and store energy from the sun—much like a greenhouse stays warm during

A transparent aerogel made from readily-available beer waste could insulate existing windows and more

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