Could the key to treating Crohn’s disease be using patients’ own modified cells?

A new technique using patients’ own modified cells to treat Crohn’s disease has been proven to be effective in experiments using human cells, with a clinical trial of the treatment expected to start in the next six months. Researchers at the NIHR Guy’s and St Thomas’ Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) developed the technique by studying white blood

Could the key to treating Crohn’s disease be using patients’ own modified cells?

The promise of stem cell technologies for treating Parkinson’s

Despite challenges, new advances in stem cell biology and genetic engineering show potential for better cell replacement therapies, say experts in a special supplement to JPD Cell replacement may play an increasing role in alleviating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in future. Writing in an open access special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, experts describe how

The promise of stem cell technologies for treating Parkinson’s

A wave energy technology is being developed that could help generate low-cost electricity for thousands of houses.

Device could deliver wave energy to thousands The device costs less than conventional designs, has fewer moving parts, and is made of durable materials. It is designed to be incorporated into existing ocean energy systems and can convert wave power into electricity. Small scale experiments in an ocean simulator show that one full-size device could

A wave energy technology is being developed that could help generate low-cost electricity for thousands of houses.

New system of “strain engineering” can change a material’s optical, electrical, and thermal properties

Applying just a bit of strain to a piece of semiconductor or other crystalline material can deform the orderly arrangement of atoms in its structure enough to cause dramatic changes in its properties, such as the way it conducts electricity, transmits light, or conducts heat. Now, a team of researchers at MIT and in Russia

New system of “strain engineering” can change a material’s optical, electrical, and thermal properties

Artificial leaves move into daylight

Artificial leaves mimic photosynthesis — the process whereby plants use water and carbon dioxide from the air to produce carbohydrates using energy from the sun. But even state-of-the-art artificial leaves, which hold promise in reducing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, only work in the laboratory because they use pure, pressurized carbon dioxide from tanks. But

Artificial leaves move into daylight

Deactivated platelets offer a potential drug-free, reversible antiplatelet therapy reducing the risk of bloodclots

Heart disease, stroke, sepsis, and cancer collectively cause the greatest number of deaths worldwide. They also have something else in common: all of them are associated with activated platelets, the cells that circulate in our bloodstreams and normally help form blood clots to stop bleeding and promote healing when we are injured, but can also contribute to dangerous blood

Deactivated platelets offer a potential drug-free, reversible antiplatelet therapy reducing the risk of bloodclots

Real science has finally caught up to the science fiction of Iron Man’s transforming exoskeleton suit

BYU researchers unfold new class of mechanical devices In a paper published today in Science Robotics, engineers at Brigham Young University detail new technology that allows them to build complex mechanisms into the exterior of a structure without taking up any actual space below the surface. This new class of mechanisms, called “developable mechanisms,” get their

Real science has finally caught up to the science fiction of Iron Man’s transforming exoskeleton suit

Health monitoring, food inspection and night vision based wearables made from graphene

The Graphene Pavilion, organised by the Graphene Flagship and supported by the European Commission and GSMA, is returning to Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019 with over 20 graphene-based prototypes, four of which are developed by the Graphene Flagship partner ICFO, based in Barcelona. These technologies aim to turn mobile phones into life saving devices. The first of ICFO’s

Health monitoring, food inspection and night vision based wearables made from graphene

A promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice

Elderly to feel fitter, faster and stronger Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a study just published in Biochemical Pharmacology. As we age, our bodies increasingly lose the ability to

A promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice

Antbot is the first walking robot that moves without GPS.

Human eyes are insensitive to polarized light and ultraviolet radiation, but that is not the case for ants, who use it to locate themselves in space. Cataglyphis desert ants in particular can cover several hundreds of meters in direct sunlight in the desert to find food, then return in a straight line to the nest,

Antbot is the first walking robot that moves without GPS.

A new non-toxic fire-retardant coating features renewable materials and better protection

    Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials. Dr. Jaime Grunlan, the Linda & Ralph Schmidt ’68 Professor in the J. Mike Walker ’66 Department of Mechanical Engineering

A new non-toxic fire-retardant coating features renewable materials and better protection

Reversing memory loss linked to depression and aging with new molecules

New therapeutic molecules developed at Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging. These molecules not only rapidly improve symptoms, but remarkably, also appear to renew the underlying brain impairments causing memory loss in preclinical models. These findings were presented today at the

Reversing memory loss linked to depression and aging with new molecules

Faces of Discovery

Copyright 2019 Innovation Toronto