Shinshu University

Shinshu University is a Japanese national university in Nagano Prefecture, Japan

A new approach to refrigeration

A research team of Tohoku University, Nissan Motor Co., Shinshu University, and Okayama University made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less

A new approach to refrigeration

One step closer to artificial muscles with gel-based robotics

Scientists are one step closer to artificial muscles. Orthotics have come a long way since their initial wood and strap designs, yet innovation lapsed when it came to compensating for muscle power–until now. A collaborative research team has designed a wearable robot to support a person’s hip joint while walking. The team, led by Minoru Hashimoto,

One step closer to artificial muscles with gel-based robotics

Mist-Collecting Plants May ‘Bioinspire’ Technology to Help Alleviate Global Water Shortages

Mimicking a unique water collection-and-release feature found in plants with tiny conical “hairs” or microfibers on the surface of their leaves may enable a technology capable of pulling fresh water from the air. Plants living in arid, mountainous and humid regions of the planet often rely on their leaves to obtain the moisture they need

Mist-Collecting Plants May ‘Bioinspire’ Technology to Help Alleviate Global Water Shortages

Super-Stretchable Yarn Is Made of Graphene

Researchers at Penn State and Shinshu University in Japan have developed a simple, scalable method of making graphene oxide (GO) fibers that are strong, stretchable and can be easily scrolled into yarns with strengths approaching that of Kevlar. The researchers made a thin film of graphene oxide by chemically exfoliating graphite into graphene flakes, which

Super-Stretchable Yarn Is Made of Graphene

The Latest Research from Shinshu University

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  • Degradable plastic by DMDO: 'Unnecessary' component key
    on November 11, 2019 at 7:09 am

    Associate Professor Yasuhiro Kohsaka of the Research Initiative for Supra-Materials (RISM) and Mai Yamashita (Graduate School of Textile Science and Technology) et al. of Shinshu University built upon ...

  • Shinshu University, Japan
    on September 9, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    University Hospital, Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Organization for Education and Student Welfare, and Shinshu University-Innovative Research & Liaison Organization.

  • Shinshu University
    on September 9, 2019 at 3:39 am

    Moreover, Shinshu University has ranked first in the "Nationwide University Local Contribution Ranking" for 4 consecutive years and is ramping up its collaborative research efforts with local ...

  • To Chill, Just Squeeze
    on July 11, 2019 at 1:33 am

    Scientists in Japan have developed a new type of refrigeration that generates a liquid-to-gas transition when a nanosponge is squeezed. AsianScientist (Jul. 11, 2019) – A research team from Tohoku ...

  • The parallel ecomorph evolution of scorpionflies: The evidence is in the DNA
    on July 8, 2019 at 1:48 pm

    Tomoya Suzuki, postdoc research fellow of the Faculty of Science at Shinshu University; Suzuki's father and expert on scorpionflies, Nobuo Suzuki, professor at the Japan Women's College of Physical ...

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Our Very Latest Posts

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

An updated analysis from OpenAI shows how dramatically the need for computational resources has increased to reach each new AI breakthrough. In 2018, OpenAI found that the amount of computational power used to train the largest AI models had doubled every 3.4 months since 2012. The San Francisco-based for-profit AI research lab has now added new

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

A specialized silk covering could protect seeds from salinity while also providing fertilizer-generating microbes. Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. A team of engineers has coated seeds with silk

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

Soft flexible robots can be created out of a new metallic material

‘Origami robots’ are state-of-the-art soft and flexible robots that are being tested for use in various applications including drug delivery in human bodies, search and rescue missions in disaster environments and humanoid robotic arms. Because these robots need to be flexible, they are often made from soft materials such as paper, plastic and rubber. To

Soft flexible robots can be created out of a new metallic material

A new approach to diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions 

Better definition could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions  Thousands of rare diseases cumulatively affect millions of people across the globe, yet because each case is so rare doctors struggle to accurately diagnose and effectively treat individual patients. Every time a patient with an unspecified disorder walks into

A new approach to diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions 

Will cycle benchmarking help to set universal measurement standards for quantum computers?

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a method that could pave the way to establishing universal standards for measuring the performance of quantum computers. The new method, called cycle benchmarking, allows researchers to assess the potential of scalability and to compare one quantum platform against another. “This finding could go a long way

Will cycle benchmarking help to set universal measurement standards for quantum computers?

A simple urine test for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home

A simple urine test under development for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home – according to new research from University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. Scientists pioneered the test which diagnoses aggressive prostate cancer and predicts whether patients will require treatment up to five years

A simple urine test for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home