National Taiwan University (NTU)

National Taiwan University (Abbreviation: NTU is a national co-educational research university located in Taipei of Taiwan.

Gene Signature May Predict Response To Cancer Chemotherapy

An eight gene ‘signature’ can predict length of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, according to new research from Taiwan. An eight gene ‘signature’ can predict length of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, according to new research from Taiwan. In a study published in the journal BMC Medicine, Researchers from Academia Sinica and the National Taiwan University College of

Gene Signature May Predict Response To Cancer Chemotherapy

Ebola antibody treatment, produced in plants, protects monkeys from lethal disease

A new Ebola virus study resulting from a widespread scientific collaboration has shown promising preliminary results, preventing disease in infected nonhuman primates using monoclonal antibodies. In this week’s online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the research team describes a proof-of-concept for using a “cocktail” of monoclonal antibodies, or mAbs,

Ebola antibody treatment, produced in plants, protects monkeys from lethal disease

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  • NTU welcomes bilingual bank to campus
    on January 3, 2020 at 1:55 am

    ... number of international students of Taiwan’s universities in the 2019 academic year. Enrolling 2,970 international students, NTU welcomed more than fellow national universities National Cheng Kung ...

  • NTU most popular university with international students in Taiwan
    on December 27, 2019 at 1:05 am

    Taipei, Dec. 27 (CNA) National Taiwan University (NTU) has the most enrolled international students among all universities in Taiwan for the 2019 academic year, according to a report released Friday ...

  • Taiwan-Janssen Project picks 3 R&D units in 2019
    on December 9, 2019 at 1:54 am

    at government-sponsored Industrial Technology Research Institute; one from National Taiwan University (NTU); and one from Taipei Medical University (TMU). Taiwan-Janssen Project is jointly sponsored ...

  • Annual Report of SPIE National Taiwan
    on October 30, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    Beside introducing metalens samples, our members saw many innovative and interesting studies in Taiwan. In this March, NTU gave us an opportunity to hold student chapter exhibition. We took advantage ...

  • NTU ranked 120th best university in the world
    on September 12, 2019 at 12:28 pm

    12 (CNA) National Taiwan University (NTU) jumped 50 places to become the ... Li Pai-chi (李百祺), who heads the Office of Research and Development at NTU, said the school has made great strides in all of ...

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Nottingham Trent University (NTU)

Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a public university in Nottingham, England.

Another step towards self-cleaning surfaces

How would you like a kitchen surface that cleans itself? Technological advances such as this could be one step closer after a breakthrough by Northumbria University and Nottingham Trent University. Using experimental techniques, researchers have made the first ever direct observation of the elusive dewetting process, which takes place when a liquid film retracts to

Another step towards self-cleaning surfaces

Sensors in Beehives May Warn of Disease

Sensors in beehives may capture early signs of disease To the human ear, the buzz of the honeybee can sound like one unchanging hum. Yet a group of researchers hopes that decoding tiny variations in the noise could help halt the catastrophic decline in the world’s honeybee population. The researchers, led by a team at

Sensors in Beehives May Warn of Disease

The Matternet: A Flying Autonomous Delivery System For The Developing World

Where Matternet is going, it doesn’t need roads. But the people there need food and medicine. And these drones can bring it to them. Nearly one billion people in rural areas live without access to all-season roads–meaning a large portion of the world’s population can’t get medication, food, and other supplies when they need them.

The Matternet: A Flying Autonomous Delivery System For The Developing World

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Nanyang Technological University (NTU)

Nanyang Technological University (Abbreviation: NTU) is one of the two largest public universities in Singapore with the biggest campus in Singapore.

Using sunlight to convert plastic waste into useful chemicals

Chemists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a method that could turn plastic waste into valuable chemicals by using sunlight. In lab experiments, the research team mixed plastics with their catalyst in a solvent, which allows the solution to harness light energy and convert the dissolved plastics into formic acid – a

Using sunlight to convert plastic waste into useful chemicals

Could microorganisms living in the gut alter or even slow down the ageing process?

An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down. All living organisms, including human beings, coexist with a myriad of microbial species living in and on

Could microorganisms living in the gut alter or even slow down the ageing process?

A secure quantum communication chip 1,000 times smaller than current technology

Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a quantum communication chip that is 1,000 times smaller than current quantum setups, but offers the same superior security quantum technology is known for. Most leading security standards used in secure communication methods – from withdrawing cash from the ATM to purchasing goods online on

A secure quantum communication chip 1,000 times smaller than current technology

Bringing humans and robots closer together using game theory

Researchers at the University of Sussex, Imperial College London and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner. The research team used adaptive control and Nash equilibrium game theory to programme a robot that can understand its human

Bringing humans and robots closer together using game theory

A smart handheld diagnostic device could allow early intervention for people with congestive heart failure

A research team from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) have invented a smart handheld medical device that could enable early intervention for patients with congestive heart failure. The portable innovation, which resembles a stethoscope, is made up of an acoustic sensor connected to a smartphone. It enables early

A smart handheld diagnostic device could allow early intervention for people with congestive heart failure

A new contact lens microneedle patch to treat eye diseases

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have developed a ‘contact lens’ patch with microneedles that could provide a painless and efficient alternative to current methods of treating eye diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration. Current localised treatment methods such as eye drops and ointments are hindered by the eye’s natural defences, blinking and tears.

A new contact lens microneedle patch to treat eye diseases

Two robots can now work in unison to 3D-print a concrete structure

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technology where two robots can work in unison to 3D-print a concrete structure. This method of concurrent 3D-printing, known as swarm printing, paves the way for a team of mobile robots to print even bigger structures in future. Developed by Assistant Professor Pham Quang Cuong and his team

Two robots can now work in unison to 3D-print a concrete structure

Using the body’s own peptides to reduce infection and inflammation as an alternative to antibiotics

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, have in collaboration with colleagues in Copenhagen and Singapore, mapped how the body’s own peptides act to reduce infection and inflammation by deactivating the toxic substances formed in the process. The study is published in Nature Communications and the researchers believe their discovery could lead to new drugs against

Using the body’s own peptides to reduce infection and inflammation as an alternative to antibiotics

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  • Antioxidant in green tea plant may be key in treating tuberculosis: NTU-led research
    on December 17, 2019 at 5:02 am

    SINGAPORE — A natural antioxidant found in the green tea plant could one day be the key to treating tuberculosis or even when it is multi-drug resistant, a team of international scientists led by ...

  • Nanyang Technological University
    on November 13, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    NTU's Institute of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute is in the forefront of research and discovery. A research team at Nanyang Technological ...

  • M1, Nanyang University launch 5G C-V2X research testbed
    on October 17, 2019 at 2:28 am

    Singapore operator M1 has partnered with Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) to integrate 5G technology into cellular vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) research testbeds and trials. M1 will ...

  • Nanyang Technological University: 3D Printing High-Volume Ash Mixtures for Construction
    on October 8, 2019 at 1:07 am

    In the recently published ‘3D printing of high-volume fly ash mixtures for digital concrete construction,’ Nanyang Technological University thesis student ... Mixtures prepared by Panda and the ...

  • Nanyang Technological University
    on September 18, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    Chemists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a method that could turn plastic waste into valuable chemicals by using sunlight. A team of molecular and ...

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  • Scientists observe ultrafast chemistry in water caused by ionizing radiation
    on January 9, 2020 at 11:03 am

    The publication marks the latest discovery by lead author, NTU Associate Professor Loh Zhi-Heng ... 2pm U.S. Eastern Standard Time. A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological ...

  • University admissions: NUS and NTU need to cast net wider, faster
    on January 1, 2020 at 5:09 pm

    The National University of Singapore (NUS) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) said recently that they are taking further steps to use a wider range of criteria to allocate places. Please ...

  • Green tea plant compound may help fight TB: Study
    on December 18, 2019 at 5:23 am

    Scientists, including those from Nanyang Technological University (NTU ... bacteria's clinical resistance," said Professor Gerhard Gruber from the NTU School of Biological Sciences. "Our discovery of ...

  • NTU-led team discovers key to pre-diabetes insulin production
    on November 17, 2019 at 9:00 pm

    A team of researchers, which includes scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU), has discovered that a type of immune ... He added that this is the first time in the world such a ...

  • Nanyang Technological University
    on November 13, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    NTU's Institute of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute is in the forefront of research and discovery. A research team at Nanyang Technological ...

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New radar cameras are 100 times smaller, 20 times cheaper to produce and consume at least 75 per cent less power

NTU's tiny Radar chip on Asst Prof Zheng Yuanjin's finger

NTU’s tiny Radar chip on Asst Prof Zheng Yuanjin’s finger

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a chip that allows new radar cameras to be made a hundred times smaller than current ones.

With this NTU technology, radar cameras that usually weigh between 50 kg and 200 kg and are commonly used in large satellites can be made to become as small as palm-sized.

Despite being small, they can produce images that are of the same high quality if not better compared to conventional radar cameras. They are also 20 times cheaper to produce and consume at least 75 per cent less power.

Developed over the past three years at NTU, the promising technology has already secured S$2.5 million in research funding from Singapore government agencies.

The radar chip has attracted the attention of several multinational corporations, and is now being researched for use in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and satellite applications.

Assistant Professor Zheng Yuanjin from NTU’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering who led the research, said that the size and effectiveness of the chip will open up new applications not possible previously.

“We have significantly shrunk the conventional radar camera into a system that is extremely compact and affordable, yet provides better accuracy. This will enable high resolution imaging radar technology to be used in objects and applications never before possible, like small drones, driverless cars and small satellite systems,” said Asst Prof Zheng.

Advantages over current technology

Current radar camera systems are usually between half and two metres in length and weigh up to 200 kg. They cost more than US$1 million on the market and can consume over 1000 watts in electricity per hour, the energy equivalent of a household air-conditioning unit running for an hour.

Known as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), these large radar cameras are often carried by large satellites and aircrafts that produce detailed images of the Earth’s surface. Objects longer than a metre, such as cars and boats, can be easily seen by the radar camera mounted on an aircraft flying at a height of 11 kilometres.

Unlike optical cameras which cannot work well at night due to insufficient light or in cloudy conditions, a radar camera uses microwaves (X-band or Ku-band) for its imaging, so it can operate well in all weather conditions and can even penetrate through foliage.

These detailed images from radar cameras can be used for environmental monitoring of disasters like forest fires, volcano eruptions and earthquakes as well as to monitor cities for traffic congestions and urban density.

But the huge size, prohibitive cost and energy consumption are deterrents for use in smaller unmanned aerial vehicles and autonomous vehicles. In comparison, NTU’s new radar chip (2mm x 3mm) when packaged into a module measures only 3cm x 4cm x 5cm, weighing less than 100 grams.

Production costs can go as low as US$10,000 per unit, while power consumption ranges from 1 to 200 watts depending on its application, similar to power-efficient LED TVs or a ceiling fan.

It can also capture objects as small as half a metre which is twice as detailed as the conventional radar camera used in large aircrafts or satellites.

Potential applications of the new radar chip

Asst Prof Zheng said that when mounted on UAVs, it can take high quality images on demand to monitor traffic conditions or even the coastlines for trespassers.

“Driverless cars will also be able to better scan the environment around them to avoid collisions and navigate more accurately in all weather conditions compared to current laser and optical technologies,” he added.

“Finally, with the space industry moving towards small satellite systems, such as the six satellites launched by NTU, smaller satellites can now also have the same advanced imaging capabilities previously seen only in the large satellites.”

Large satellites can weigh up to 1,000 kg, but microsatellites weigh only 100 to 200 kg.

Learn more: New NTU microchip shrinks radar cameras to fit into a palm

 

 

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NTU scientists unveil social and telepresence robots

Prof Nadia Thalmann (left) posing beside Nadine. NTU-built EDGAR telepresence robot (right).

Prof Nadia Thalmann (left) posing beside Nadine. NTU-built EDGAR telepresence robot (right).

Say hello to Nadine, a “receptionist” at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore). She is friendly, and will greet you back. Next time you meet her, she will remember your name and your previous conversation with her.

She looks almost like a human being, with soft skin and flowing brunette hair. She smiles when greeting you, looks at you in the eye when talking, and can also shake hands with you. And she is a humanoid.

Unlike conventional robots, Nadine has her own personality, mood and emotions. She can be happy or sad, depending on the conversation. She also has a good memory, and can recognise the people she has met, and remembers what the person had said before.

Nadine is the latest social robot developed by scientists at NTU. The doppelganger of its creator, Prof Nadia Thalmann, Nadine is powered by intelligent software similar to Apple’s Siri or Microsoft’s Cortana. Nadine can be a personal assistant in offices and homes in future. And she can be used as social companions for the young and the elderly.

A humanoid like Nadine is just one of the interfaces where the technology can be applied. It can also be made virtual and appear on a TV or computer screen, and become a low-cost virtual social companion.

With further progress in robotics sparked by technological improvements in silicon chips, sensors and computation, physical social robots such as Nadine are poised to become more visible in offices and homes in future.

The rise of social robots

Prof Thalmann, the director of the Institute for Media Innovation who led the development of Nadine, said these social robots are among NTU’s many exciting new media innovations that companies can leverage for commercialisation.

“Robotics technologies have advanced significantly over the past few decades and are already being used in manufacturing and logistics. As countries worldwide face challenges of an aging population, social robots can be one solution to address the shrinking workforce, become personal companions for children and the elderly at home, and even serve as a platform for healthcare services in future,” explained Prof Thalmann, an expert in virtual humans and a faculty from NTU’s School of Computer Engineering.

“Over the past four years, our team at NTU have been fostering cross-disciplinary research in social robotics technologies – involving engineering, computer science, linguistics, psychology and other fields – to transform a virtual human, from within a computer, into a physical being that is able to observe and interact with other humans.

“This is somewhat like a real companion that is always with you and conscious of what is happening. So in future, these socially intelligent robots could be like C-3PO, the iconic golden droid from Star Wars, with knowledge of language and etiquette.”

Telepresence robot lets people be in two or more places at once

Nadine’s robot-in-arms, EDGAR, was also put through its paces at NTU’s new media showcase, complete with a rear-projection screen for its face and two highly articulated arms.

EDGAR is a tele-presence robot optimised to project the gestures of its human user. By standing in front of a specialised webcam, a user can control EDGAR remotely from anywhere in the world. The user’s face and expressions will be displayed on the robot’s face in real time, while the robot mimics the person’s upper body movements.

EDGAR can also deliver speeches by autonomously acting out a script. With an integrated webcam, he automatically tracks the people he meets to engage them in conversation, giving them informative and witty replies to their questions.

Such social robots are ideal for use at public venues, such as tourist attractions and shopping centres, as they can offer practical information to visitors.

Led by Assoc Prof Gerald Seet from the School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and the BeingThere Centre at NTU, this made-in-Singapore robot represents three years of research and development.

“EDGAR is a real demonstration of how telepresence and social robots can be used for business and education,” added Prof Seet. “Telepresence provides an additional dimension to mobility. The user may project his or her physical presence at one or more locations simultaneously, meaning that geography is no longer an obstacle.

“In future, a renowned educator giving lectures or classes to large groups of people in different locations at the same time could become commonplace. Or you could attend classes or business meetings all over the world using robot proxies, saving time and travel costs.”

Given that some companies have expressed interest in the robot technologies, the next step for these NTU scientists is to look at how they can partner with industry to bring them to the market.

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