Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

The Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine is the largest and oldest continuously operating medical school in Virginia

Could certain antidepressants provide frontline treatment for multiple infectious diseases?

Some antidepressants could potentially be used to treat a wide range of diseases caused by bacteria living within cells, according to work by researchers in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine and collaborators at other institutions. Research published in the April print edition of the journal Life Science Alliance, shows that antidepressant drugs called FIASMAs, including desipramine,

Could certain antidepressants provide frontline treatment for multiple infectious diseases?

A vaccine for fentanyl addiction?

A vaccine that combines a fentanyl antigen with a tetanus toxoid has been shown to reduce fentanyl choices and increase food choices with effects lasting several months in rats. These results suggest that the vaccine may not only decrease dangerous drug-taking behavior, but can also increase behaviors maintained by healthier non-drug alternatives. The findings are

A vaccine for fentanyl addiction?

The Latest Research from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

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How about precise control of computing with magnetic waves — with no electricity needed?

Circuit design offers a path to “spintronic” devices that use little electricity and generate practically no heat. MIT researchers have devised a novel circuit design that enables precise control of computing with magnetic waves — with no electricity needed. The advance takes a step toward practical magnetic-based devices, which have the potential to compute far

How about precise control of computing with magnetic waves — with no electricity needed?

Measuring the massive migration of sea creatures at night from space using lasers

Every night, under the cover of darkness, countless small sea creatures – from squid to krill – swim from the ocean depths to near the surface to feed. This vast animal migration – the largest on the planet and a critical part of Earth’s climate system – has been observed globally for the first time

Measuring the massive migration of sea creatures at night from space using lasers

New material could offer an efficient eco-friendly advance in cooling technology

An international research team led by the University of Maryland has developed a novel elastocaloric cooling material that is highly efficient, eco-friendly and easily scaled-up for commercial use. The researchers new cooling material is a nickel-titanium alloy that was sculpted using additive technology (3-D printing). Their work is published in the November 29 issue of

New material could offer an efficient eco-friendly advance in cooling technology

Playing the sounds of healthy reefs attracts young fish to degraded coral reefs

Young fish can be drawn to degraded coral reefs by loudspeakers playing the sounds of healthy reefs, according to new research published today in Nature Communications. An international team of scientists from the UK’s University of Exeter and University of Bristol, and Australia’s James Cook University and Australian Institute of Marine Science, say this “acoustic enrichment” could

Playing the sounds of healthy reefs attracts young fish to degraded coral reefs

Which is more believable: hyper-realistic masks or human faces?

Some silicone masks are now so realistic they can easily be mistaken for real faces, new research suggests. Hyper-realistic masks are made from flexible materials such as silicone and are designed to imitate real human faces – down to every last freckle, wrinkle and strand of real human hair. In a study by the Universities

Which is more believable: hyper-realistic masks or human faces?

Checking to see if immunotherapy is working using artificial intelligence

Case Western Reserve researchers use AI with routine CT scans to predict how well lung cancer patients will respond to expensive treatment based off changes in texture patterns inside and outside the tumor. Scientists from the Case Western Reserve University digital imaging lab, already pioneering the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to predict whether chemotherapy

Checking to see if immunotherapy is working using artificial intelligence