University of Bath

The University of Bath is a campus university located in Bath, United Kingdom.

Artificial neurons that behave just like the real thing have been developed to cure chronic diseases

For the first time researchers successfully reproduced the electrical properties of biological neurons onto semiconductor chips. Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists – a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases

Artificial neurons that behave just like the real thing have been developed to cure chronic diseases

A TB vaccine that doesn’t need refrigeration moves much closer

A promising TB vaccine can be protected from heat damage with a technique developed at the University of Bath. Scientists working on a new tuberculosis (TB) vaccine have achieved a major step forward by showing that a promising TB antigen and a novel vaccine adjuvant can be protected from heat damage with a technique developed

A TB vaccine that doesn’t need refrigeration moves much closer

A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight moves closer

Researchers have used a graphite coating that makes perovskite solar cells waterproof. A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight is a step closer thanks to new research from the University of Bath’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies. With the pressure on global leaders to reduce carbon emissions significantly

A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight moves closer

We should pay more attention to a potentially deadly bacterium that’s on everyone’s skin

Scientists from the Milner Centre for Evolution warn S. epidermidis should be taken more seriously Forget MRSA and E.coli, there’s another bacterium that is becoming increasingly dangerous due to antibiotic resistance – and it’s present on the skin of every person on the planet. A close relative of MRSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, is a major cause of life-threatening

We should pay more attention to a potentially deadly bacterium that’s on everyone’s skin

Artificial intelligence can edit the facial expressions of actors to accurately match dubbed voices

New video editing technique could save time and reduce costs for the film industry. Researchers have developed a system using artificial intelligence that can edit the facial expressions of actors to accurately match dubbed voices, saving time and reducing costs for the film industry. It can also be used to correct gaze and head pose

Artificial intelligence can edit the facial expressions of actors to accurately match dubbed voices

Revolution in diabetes monitoring – and it is bloodless

Scientists have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, which promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test. Scientists have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, which promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test, potentially removing the need for millions of diabetics to frequently carry

Revolution in diabetes monitoring – and it is bloodless

A potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action

A potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath. The compound has shown significant potential after studies in mice. The research is published in the British Journal of Pharmacology. Dr Sarah Bailey and Professor Steve Husbands with their research team Around one

A potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action

Making biodegradable plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide

Some biodegradable plastics could in the future be made using sugar and carbon dioxide, replacing unsustainable plastics made from crude oil, following research by scientists from the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath. Safer form of polycarbonate plastic Polycarbonate is used to make drinks bottles, lenses for glasses and in

Making biodegradable plastic from sugar and carbon dioxide

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  • University of Bath Appoints Rydon for New Automotive Research Facility Construction
    on December 9, 2019 at 10:38 pm

    The University of Bath has awarded Rydon the contract for the construction of its new automotive propulsion research facility as part of the Institute for Advanced Automotive Propulsion Systems. The ...

  • Husbands stress out once their wives contribute this exact percentage of the family income, research shows
    on November 23, 2019 at 6:47 am

    Dr. Joanna Syrda, an economist at the University of Bath’s School of Management ... jumped from just 13% in 1980 to approximately 38% in 2013, according to the Pew Research Center. And a related 2017 ...

  • University of Bath
    on November 17, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    New research from the University of Bath shows there is a lack of knowledge about how to treat children in chronic pain. While around 300,000 adults have been studied as part of trials for the ...

  • University of Bath
    on September 9, 2019 at 3:39 am

    Founded in 1966 the University of Bath is located in the south west of England ... facilities and in 2014 the Research Excellence Framework graded 87% of Bath’s research activities as being ‘world ...

  • University of Bath School of Management
    on September 9, 2019 at 3:39 am

    Established in 1966, the University of Bath School of Management in Bath ... Bath School of Management has a number of research consortia that work across a number of disciplines. They are: The Centre ...

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Is the pixel about to die?

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“This is a significant breakthrough which will revolutionise the way visual media are produced”

 
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The team behind the project – University of Bath, Root6 Technology, Smoke & Mirrors and Ovation Data Services – are now looking for industry buy-in to the research to expand its potential applications.

The codec has been launched at this week’s CVMP 9th European Conference on Visual Media Production held at Vue Cinema in Leicester Square, London.

Digital pictures are built from a rectangular grid of coloured cells, or pixels. The smaller and closer the pixels are together, the better the quality of the image. Pixel-based movies need huge amounts of data and have to be compressed, losing quality. They are also difficult and time consuming to process.

The alternative, a vector-based format, presents the image using contoured colours. Until now there has not been a way to choose and fill between the contours at professional quality. The Bath team has finally solved these problems.

A codec is a computer programme capable of encoding or decoding a digital video stream. The researchers at Bath have developed a new, highly sophisticated codec which is able to create and fill between contours, overcoming the problems preventing their widespread use. The result is a resolution-independent form of movie or image, capable of the highest visual quality but without a pixel in sight.

Professor Phil Willis from the University of Bath said: “This is a significant breakthrough which will revolutionise the way visual media are produced.

“We already have some great company partners. To accelerate the project we’ll need more companies from around the world to get involved. At the moment we’re focusing on applications in post-production and we are working directly with leading companies in this area. However there are clear applications in web, tablets and mobile which we haven’t explored in detail yet.

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Big breakthrough on tiny scale for cancer by scientists at the University of Bath

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Scientists at the University of Bath have taken a small but significant step in the fight against cancer – by making nanoparticles glow in the dark.

The team from the university’s Department of Chemistry have announced the development of a new technique to create nanoparticles, tiny markers that can be attached to drugs and cells, that are fluorescent, and therefore far more easily traced and tracked through the body and in the lab.

The group has teamed up with the Research Complex at Harwell and private firms that manufacture nanoparticles for the research industry.

In the short term, Dr Sofia Pascu and Professor Tony James from the Bath university said their work will help fellow scientists work on finding drugs to beat cancer and other diseases more accurately and cheaply, but in the long term it could also mean that doctors can diagnose and then treat tumours that are otherwise inaccessible.

The Bath scientists and private industry colleagues have been awarded £1 million from the Technology Strategy Board, the Swindon-based science quango, to work on the new technology – and said it could be a giant leap forward in the way diseases such as cancer are researched and treatments developed.

Current technologies try to mark antibodies and nanoparticles with dye, but that fades too quickly when it is attached to a drug or a cell the scientists want to track. Developing a new “suite” of fluorescent nanoparticles will enable a straightforward way of seeing the impact of a drug or the growth or development of a cancer cell.

Dr Pascu is leading the research project. “This research is building upon new and exciting technologies where we already have been achieving some success – fluorescent nanoparticles with targeting molecules – to produce a new generation of tools for research, diagnostics and biological imaging involving custom-built antibodies,” she said.

“Existing fluorescent labels are either based on dyes that have a short lifetime, or commercial particles called quantum dots, which are expensive and have problems with stability and toxicity.

“We aim to overcome these challenges by investigating new types of nanoparticles that do not interfere with biological materials in cells, and can be produced more cheaply than existing technologies.”

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