University of South Carolina (USC)

The University of South Carolina (also referred to as The USC, SC, South Carolina, or simply Carolina) is a public, co-educational research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States, with seven satellite campuses.

Patents Issued for Novel Home Cleaning Method to Reduce Asthma

A team of researchers from the University of South Carolina received two patents for a new method to rid carpets, mattresses and other furniture of harmful allergens and pests that cause asthma. The patents (Methods and Compositions for Eliminating Allergens and Allergen-Producing Organisms) are the work of Michael Matthews, Jian Zhang and Allan Quick and

Patents Issued for Novel Home Cleaning Method to Reduce Asthma

Research shows smartphone sensors leave trackable fingerprints

  “That’s a serious threat.” Research by Associate Professor Romit Roy Choudhury and graduate students Sanorita Dey and Nirupam Roy have demonstrated that the accelerometers used in mobile devices posses unique, trackable fingerprints. This suggests that even when a smartphone application doesn’t ask for geospatial information (“…would like to use your current location”), there are

Research shows smartphone sensors leave trackable fingerprints

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

“It’s a really, really big problem, not only for individual patients, but also for society.” Penicillin, one of the scientific marvels of the 20th century, is currently losing a lot of battles it once won against bacterial infections. But scientists at the University of South Carolina have just reported a new approach to restoring its combat

Penicillin redux: Rearming proven warriors for the 21st century

Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing

“This experiment with ferroelectric domains demonstrates the possibility of memcomputing.” Unexpected behavior in ferroelectric materials explored by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a new approach to information storage and processing. Ferroelectric materials are known for their ability to spontaneously switch polarization when an electric field is applied. Using a

Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing

Competition Changes How People View Strangers Online

An anonymous stranger you encounter on websites like Yelp or Amazon may seem to be just like you, and a potential friend. But a stranger on a site like eBay is a whole different story. A new study finds that on websites where people compete against each other, assumptions about strangers change. Previous research has

Competition Changes How People View Strangers Online

Turning Pine Sap Into “Ever-Green” Plastics

Plastic bags are a bane of nature. And not just bags – just about all plastics, really. Most are made out of petroleum, and a piece of plastic, if it misses the recycling bin and ends up in a landfill, will probably outlast human civilization. But Chuanbing Tang at the University of South Carolina is

Turning Pine Sap Into “Ever-Green” Plastics

Robot Improves Quality of Life for Autistic Children

In what could be called a breakthrough in the world for the betterment of children with special needs, Charlie could be the latest name. Charlie is a robot designed by University of South Carolina‘s College of Engineering and Computing doctoral student, Laura Boccanfuso and she hopes that her invention could help children with autism improve

Robot Improves Quality of Life for Autistic Children

Automatic photo tagging with TagSense smartphone app

The old adage says “a picture is worth a thousand words,” but just exactly which words is the question. While facial recognition and GPS-enabled cameras have made tagging digital snapshots with names and locations much easier, a team of students from Duke University and the University of South Carolina has developed a smartphone app called

Automatic photo tagging with TagSense smartphone app

The Latest Research from University of South Carolina (USC)

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Our Very Latest Posts

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

An updated analysis from OpenAI shows how dramatically the need for computational resources has increased to reach each new AI breakthrough. In 2018, OpenAI found that the amount of computational power used to train the largest AI models had doubled every 3.4 months since 2012. The San Francisco-based for-profit AI research lab has now added new

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

A specialized silk covering could protect seeds from salinity while also providing fertilizer-generating microbes. Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. A team of engineers has coated seeds with silk

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

Soft flexible robots can be created out of a new metallic material

‘Origami robots’ are state-of-the-art soft and flexible robots that are being tested for use in various applications including drug delivery in human bodies, search and rescue missions in disaster environments and humanoid robotic arms. Because these robots need to be flexible, they are often made from soft materials such as paper, plastic and rubber. To

Soft flexible robots can be created out of a new metallic material

A new approach to diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions 

Better definition could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions  Thousands of rare diseases cumulatively affect millions of people across the globe, yet because each case is so rare doctors struggle to accurately diagnose and effectively treat individual patients. Every time a patient with an unspecified disorder walks into

A new approach to diagnosis and treatment for rare diseases that cumulatively affect millions 

Will cycle benchmarking help to set universal measurement standards for quantum computers?

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a method that could pave the way to establishing universal standards for measuring the performance of quantum computers. The new method, called cycle benchmarking, allows researchers to assess the potential of scalability and to compare one quantum platform against another. “This finding could go a long way

Will cycle benchmarking help to set universal measurement standards for quantum computers?

A simple urine test for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home

A simple urine test under development for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home – according to new research from University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. Scientists pioneered the test which diagnoses aggressive prostate cancer and predicts whether patients will require treatment up to five years

A simple urine test for prostate cancer detection can now use urine samples collected at home

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