University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Minnesota, U of M, or The U) is a public research university located in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, with the Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses being approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) apart.

What do robots know? Soldiers get help from scientists to find out

An Army-led research team developed new algorithms and filled in knowledge gaps about how robots contribute to teams and what robots know about their environment and teammates. Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Lay, an engineer with the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory, is part of a multidisciplinary team of researchers from the Army, Carnegie

What do robots know? Soldiers get help from scientists to find out

Shape-changing textiles powered by body heat will change how we interact with our clothes

A breakthrough invention in wearable technology has the potential to change how we interact with the clothes we wear every day. A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Design of Active Materials and Structures Lab (DAMSL) and Wearable Technology Lab (WTL) details the development of a temperature-responsive textile that can be used to

Shape-changing textiles powered by body heat will change how we interact with our clothes

Violent crime rates increase with exposure to air pollution

Breathing dirty air can make you sick. But according to new research, it can also make you more aggressive. That’s the conclusion from a set of studies recently authored by Colorado State University researchers in economics, atmospheric science and statistics. Together, the team found strong links between short-term exposure to air pollution and aggressive behavior,

Violent crime rates increase with exposure to air pollution

The first non-invasively mind-controlled robotic arm

A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota, has made a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), researchers have developed the first-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm exhibiting the ability to continuously track and follow a computer cursor. Being able

The first non-invasively mind-controlled robotic arm

Climate change is already affecting global food production

The world’s top 10 crops —  barley, cassava, maize, oil palm, rapeseed, rice, sorghum, soybean, sugarcane and wheat — supply a combined 83 percent of all calories produced on cropland. Yields have long been projected to decrease in future climate conditions. Now, new research shows climate change has already affected production of these key energy sources — and

Climate change is already affecting global food production

New technology can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered new technology that can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit. These findings could increase the speed and lower the cost of thousands of chemical processes used in developing fertilizers, foods, fuels, plastics,

New technology can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit

The first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level

Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency. Ultrasensitive biosensors for probing protein structures could greatly improve the depth of diagnosis for

The first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level

Active canopy sensor-based nitrogen management program is both efficient and works

Too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. That’s certainly true for nitrogen fertilizers. Without enough nitrogen, crops don’t grow well. Yields are reduced significantly. Applying too much nitrogen fertilizer, on the other hand, can hurt the environment. Nitrogen can enter the watershed, polluting aquatic ecosystems. Microbes can also convert the excess

Active canopy sensor-based nitrogen management program is both efficient and works

The Latest Research from University of Minnesota

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Which is more believable: hyper-realistic masks or human faces?

Some silicone masks are now so realistic they can easily be mistaken for real faces, new research suggests. Hyper-realistic masks are made from flexible materials such as silicone and are designed to imitate real human faces – down to every last freckle, wrinkle and strand of real human hair. In a study by the Universities

Which is more believable: hyper-realistic masks or human faces?

Checking to see if immunotherapy is working using artificial intelligence

Case Western Reserve researchers use AI with routine CT scans to predict how well lung cancer patients will respond to expensive treatment based off changes in texture patterns inside and outside the tumor. Scientists from the Case Western Reserve University digital imaging lab, already pioneering the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to predict whether chemotherapy

Checking to see if immunotherapy is working using artificial intelligence

How machine intelligences and human users work together on Wikipedia

New study looks at the ways machine intelligences and human users work together to improve and expand the world’s largest digital encyclopedia Since launching in 2001, Wikipedia has evolved into a sprawling repository of human knowledge, with 40 million collaboratively-written articles and almost 500 million monthly users. Maintaining that project requires more than 137,000 volunteer

How machine intelligences and human users work together on Wikipedia

Electronic tags on sharks, penguins, turtles and other species could help monitor the oceans

Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. Thousands of marine animals are tagged for a variety of research and conservation purposes, but at present the information gathered isn’t widely used to track climate change and other shifts in the oceans. Instead, monitoring

Electronic tags on sharks, penguins, turtles and other species could help monitor the oceans

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

An updated analysis from OpenAI shows how dramatically the need for computational resources has increased to reach each new AI breakthrough. In 2018, OpenAI found that the amount of computational power used to train the largest AI models had doubled every 3.4 months since 2012. The San Francisco-based for-profit AI research lab has now added new

The computing power needed to train AI is growing alarmingly

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

A specialized silk covering could protect seeds from salinity while also providing fertilizer-generating microbes. Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. A team of engineers has coated seeds with silk

A new covering can help seeds grow in unproductive soils

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