Brain-inspired multistate memory material stores more than just zeroes and ones

via University of Twente

via University of Twente

Our brain does not work like a typical computer memory storing just ones and zeroes: thanks to a much larger variation in memory states, it can calculate faster consuming less energy. Scientists of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente (The Netherlands) now developed a ferro-electric material with a memory function resembling synapses and neurons in the brain, resulting in a multistate memory. They publish their results in this week’s Advanced Functional Materials.

The material that could be the basic building block for ‘brain-inspired computing’ is lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT): a sandwich of materials with several attractive properties. One of them is that it is ferro-electric: you can switch it to a desired state, this state remains stable after the electric field is gone. This is called polarization: it leads to a fast memory function that is non-volatile. Combined with processor chips, a computer could be designed that starts much faster, for example. The UT scientists now added a thin layer of zinc oxide to the PZT, 25 nanometer thickness. They discovered that switching from one state to another not only happens from ‘zero’ to ‘one’ vice versa. It is possible to control smaller areas within the crystal: will they be polarized (‘flip’) or not?

MULTISTATE

By using variable writing times in those smaller areas, the result is that many states can be stored anywhere between zero and one. This resembles the way synapses and neurons ‘weigh’ signals in our brain. Multistate memories, coupled to transistors, could drastically improve the speed of pattern recognition, for example: our brain performs this kind of tasks consuming only a fraction of the energy a computer system needs. Looking at the graphs, the writing times seem quite long compared to nowaday’s processor speeds, but it is possible to create many memories in parallel. The function of the brain has already been mimicked in software like neurale networks, but in that case conventional digital hardware is still a limitation. The new material is a first step towards electronic hardware with a brain-like memory. Finding solutions for combining PZT with semiconductors, or even developing new kinds of semiconductors for this, is one of the next steps.

This research has been done within the Inorganic Materials Science group, of UT’s MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. Within this group, also other attractive properties of PZT have been found, like piezo-electrical behavior: the material can expand using an electric voltage, pressing it can also generate a voltage, in turn.

Learn more: UT SCIENTISTS DEVELOP BRAIN-INSPIRED MEMORY MATERIAL

 

The Latest on: Multistate memory

via Google News

 

The Latest on: Multistate memory
  • Former Jefferson County Police chief dies, funeral arrangements made
    on November 10, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    The family asked for memorial contributions to be made in memory of Eddie to the American Cancer Society ... Two suspects have been taken into custody after a multi-state police chase through Indiana ...

  • FBI 'Most Wanted' suspect is arrested, charged in Moorhead bank heist
    on October 23, 2019 at 6:07 pm

    The hunt for a suspect whose multistate crime spree landed him on an FBI Most Wanted ... This arrest "underscores that the FBI has a long memory and a broad reach and works well with our law ...

  • Researchers Develop Brain-Mimicking Nano Memory Cell
    on September 13, 2019 at 4:12 am

    Scientists have developed the world’s first electronic multi-state memory cell that imitates the way the brain stores and processes information. The study, published in the journal Advanced Functional ...

  • Prevagen Memory Product Maker Fights Cert. In Ad Suit
    on October 16, 2017 at 6:36 pm

    The packaging’s side declares that Prevagen will “improve memory within 90 days.” The supplement is available on Amazon.com and at CVS pharmacies, and has been advertised on CNN. In a September motion ...

  • Memristor can do multistate processing as well as nonvolatile memory
    on January 18, 2017 at 10:23 am

    Soft Cap Emitting Electromagnetic Waves has Reversed Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s patients Rapamycin and Two Other Drugs Extends Lifespan Twice As Much As Any Other Drug Combo ...

  • Scientists develop brain-inspired memory material
    on July 7, 2016 at 4:59 pm

    Our brain does not work like a typical computer memory storing just ones and zeroes: thanks to a much larger variation in memory states, it can calculate faster consuming less energy. Scientists have ...

  • Electronics That Mimic Brain Memory
    on May 26, 2015 at 10:34 pm

    Scientists are now one step closer to building a bionic brain, thanks to a nanodevice that can both process and store information. AsianScientist (May 27, 2015) – Researchers at the RMIT University’s ...

  • Nano memory cell development paves way for bionic brain
    on May 12, 2015 at 9:19 am

    Researchers from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) in Australia, who published their findings in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, built a multi-state memory cell that has ...

  • Nano memory cell can mimic the brain’s long-term memory
    on May 12, 2015 at 6:25 am

    Researchers at the MicroNano Research Facility (MNRF) have built the one of the world's first electronic multi-state memory cell which ... (2015, May 12). Nano memory cell can mimic the brain’s ...

  • Nano memory cell can mimic the brain's long-term memory
    on May 12, 2015 at 3:42 am

    RMIT University researchers have mimicked the way the human brain processes information with the development of an electronic long-term memory cell ... the one of the world's first electronic ...

via  Bing News

 

You are most welcome to leave your comments or ideas

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.