Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense food contamination

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense contamination. MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense food contamination

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles Restoring the United States’ lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas

U.S. forests, wetlands and agricultural lands could absorb one-fifth of greenhouse gas pollution — equivalent to emissions from all U.S. vehicles

Fusion power pushes past 100 million degrees

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), nicknamed the “Chinese artificial sun”, achieved an electron temperature of over 100 million degrees in its core plasma during a four-month experiment this year. That’s about seven times more than the interior of the Sun, which is about 15 million degrees C. The experiment shows China is making significant

Fusion power pushes past 100 million degrees

A blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined “liquid biopsy,” epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings, published online today in Nature, describe not only a way to detect cancer, but hold promise

A blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages

Can changing mucus help people battle cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis?

UNC School of Medicine and Duke University researchers show why coughing can’t force mucus free from airways to help people battle cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis, and how new treatments could alter mucus to make coughing more therapeutic. For healthy people, mucus is our friend. It traps potential pathogens so our airways can dispatch nasty

Can changing mucus help people battle cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis?

New methods to identify Alzheimer’s drug candidates that have anti-aging properties

Salk research focuses on the development of compounds that may protect against the diseases of aging, such as Alzheimer’s Old age is the greatest risk factor for many diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer. Geroprotectors are a recently identified class of anti-aging compounds. New Salk research has now identified a unique subclass of these

New methods to identify Alzheimer’s drug candidates that have anti-aging properties

A five-minute scan of blood vessels in the neck during mid-life could predict cognitive decline ten years before symptoms appear

A five-minute scan of blood vessels in the neck during mid-life could predict cognitive decline ten years before symptoms appear, claims new UCL research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). The findings were presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions conference in Chicago. If confirmed in larger studies, the scan could become part of routine screening

A five-minute scan of blood vessels in the neck during mid-life could predict cognitive decline ten years before symptoms appear

Precision medicine gets a new benchtop machine to manufacture small batches of biopharmaceuticals on demand

System can be rapidly reconfigured to produce a variety of protein drugs. Biopharmaceuticals, a class of drugs comprising proteins such as antibodies and hormones, represent a fast-growing sector of the pharmaceutical industry. They’re increasingly important for “precision medicine” — drugs tailored toward the genetic or molecular profiles of particular groups of patients. Such drugs are

Precision medicine gets a new benchtop machine to manufacture small batches of biopharmaceuticals on demand

The road is open to ultra-low-power microchips

Innovative approach to controlling magnetism could lead to next-generation memory and logic devices. A new approach to controlling magnetism in a microchip could open the doors to memory, computing, and sensing devices that consume drastically less power than existing versions. The approach could also overcome some of the inherent physical limitations that have been slowing

The road is open to ultra-low-power microchips

It is now possible to obtain the structures of small molecules, such as certain hormones and medications, in as little as 30 minutes

UCLA/Caltech team uncovers a new and simple way to learn the structures of small molecules In a new study that one scientist called jaw-dropping, a joint UCLA/Caltech team has shown that it is possible to obtain the structures of small molecules, such as certain hormones and medications, in as little as 30 minutes. That’s hours

It is now possible to obtain the structures of small molecules, such as certain hormones and medications, in as little as 30 minutes

The planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance shows several are already crossed

Stratospheric ozone depletion The stratospheric ozone layer in the atmosphere filters out ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. If this layer decreases, increasing amounts of UV radiation will reach ground level. This can cause a higher incidence of skin cancer in humans as well as damage to terrestrial and marine biological systems. The appearance of the Antarctic ozone

The planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance shows several are already crossed

New therapy could repair mutations that cause genetic diseases

Experimental Rice U. therapy could repair mutations that cause genetic diseases A new technology that relies on a moth-infecting virus and nanomagnets could be used to edit defective genes that give rise to diseases like sickle cell, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Rice University bioengineer Gang Bao has combined magnetic nanoparticles with a viral container

New therapy could repair mutations that cause genetic diseases

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