Robot helpers for the joy and sorrow of dementia

Caregivers design robots that increase joyful moments and reduce emotional stress Building robots that can help people with dementia has been a longtime goal for roboticists. Yet until now, no one has sought to survey informal caregivers, such as family members, about what characteristics and roles these robots should have. A team of scientists at

Robot helpers for the joy and sorrow of dementia

Phase-switching liquids can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art coatings

Most techniques to prevent frost and ice formation on surfaces rely heavily on heating or liquid chemicals that need to be repeatedly reapplied because they easily wash away. Even advanced anti-icing materials have problems functioning under conditions of high humidity and subzero conditions, when frost and ice formation go into overdrive. Now, researchers from the

Phase-switching liquids can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art coatings

Creating hydrogen fuel from seawater

Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A Stanford-led team has now developed a way to harness seawater – Earth’s most abundant source – for chemical energy. Stanford researchers have devised a way to generate hydrogen fuel using solar power, electrodes and saltwater

Creating hydrogen fuel from seawater

World’s first online polygraph for text messaging gets it right between 85 to 100 percent of the time

Can you spot a liar? It’s tricky enough in face-to-face conversations that offer facial expressions, gestures and tone of voice because those physical cues add context. Spotting a liar gets even tougher in blind computer conversations. Florida State University researcher Shuyuan Ho wants to shed those blinders by creating a revolutionary online polygraph. “The future

World’s first online polygraph for text messaging gets it right between 85 to 100 percent of the time

Creating a hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have created a hydrogel that could one day be made into a contact lens to more effectively treat corneal melting, a condition that is a significant cause for blindness world-wide. The incurable eye disease can be initiated by a number of different causes such as autoimmune diseases (like rheumatoid

Creating a hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease

Yet more evidence of connectivity between the gut and the brain

Tumult in the bacterial community that occupies your gut—known as your microbiome—doesn’t just cause indigestion. For people recovering from a stroke, it may influence how they get better. A recent study by Allison Brichacek and Candice Brown, researchers in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests that stroke patients’ microbiomes—and even the structure of their guts—may still be

Yet more evidence of connectivity between the gut and the brain

A desk lamp powering devices in the room

Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from

A desk lamp powering devices in the room

Call for for a global moratorium on heritable genome editing

A University of Otago bioethicist has added his voice to a global plea for a moratorium on heritable genome editing from a group of international scientists and ethicists in the wake of the recent Chinese experiment aiming to produce HIV immune children. In an article in the latest issue of international scientific journal Nature, Professor Jing-Bao

Call for for a global moratorium on heritable genome editing

A fast and easy test for Preeclampsia

Pregnant women may receive critical treatment sooner with help of fast and easy test About one in 20 women develop preeclampsia during pregnancy, which can be life-threatening to both moms and babies. However, it is difficult to diagnose because symptoms often mimic those of a normal pregnancy, such as swelling and headaches. Managing the condition early

A fast and easy test for Preeclampsia

Inventing a nano-bot that can probe inside human cells

U of T Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic ‘tweezers’ that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell in three dimensions with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells, and could point the way toward enhanced diagnosis and treatment. Professor Yu Sun (MIE, IBBME, ECE)

Inventing a nano-bot that can probe inside human cells

Can immunotherapy be effective in the fight against TB?

In part because of its resistance to many antibiotics, tuberculosis kills approximately 1.7 million people worldwide each year. But new research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that structures released by the infected cells may be used in tandem with antibiotics to boost the body’s immune system, helping fight off the disease. The paper, published

Can immunotherapy be effective in the fight against TB?

The stress of spaceflight can reactivate viruses such as Herpes, putting future deep-space missions in jeopardy

The stress of spaceflight gives viruses a holiday from immune surveillance, putting future deep-space missions in jeopardy Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight

The stress of spaceflight can reactivate viruses such as Herpes, putting future deep-space missions in jeopardy

Faces of Discovery

Copyright 2019 Innovation Toronto