How to free up around a fifth of agricultural land globally

Making minor changes to how food is produced, supplied and consumed around the world could free up around a fifth of agricultural land, research suggests. Scientists have applied the British cycling team’s strategy of marginal gains – the idea that making multiple small changes can lead to significant effects overall – to the global food system.

How to free up around a fifth of agricultural land globally

More muscle for artificial muscles inspired by a cucumber

New MIT system of contracting fibers could be a boon for biomedical devices and robotics. As a cucumber plant grows, it sprouts tightly coiled tendrils that seek out supports in order to pull the plant upward. This ensures the plant receives as much sunlight exposure as possible. Now, researchers at MIT have found a way

More muscle for artificial muscles inspired by a cucumber

3D-printed spacecraft parts made and assembled in orbit

NASA has awarded a $73.7 million contract to Made In Space, Inc. of Mountain View, California, to demonstrate the ability of a small spacecraft, called Archinaut One, to manufacture and assemble spacecraft components in low-Earth orbit. The in-space robotic manufacturing and assembly technologies could be important for America’s Moon to Mars exploration approach. The contract is the

3D-printed spacecraft parts made and assembled in orbit

Sheath-run artificial muscles for intelligent structures

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line. n a new study published July 12 in the journal Science, the researchers describe their latest advance, called sheath-run artificial

Sheath-run artificial muscles for intelligent structures

Squeezing quantum dots could accelerate the development of quantum information technologies and brain-inspired computing

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) developed a new technique that could enable future advancements in quantum technology. The technique squeezes quantum dots, tiny particles made of thousands of atoms, to emit single photons (individual particles of light) with precisely the same color and with positions that can be less than a millionth

Squeezing quantum dots could accelerate the development of quantum information technologies and brain-inspired computing

3D-printing skin and bone so astronauts might heal themselves on missions

3D printing human tissue could help keep astronauts healthy all the way to Mars. An ESA project has produced its first bioprinted skin and bone samples. These state-of-the-art samples were prepared by scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University (TUD), part of the project consortium together with OHB System AG as the prime contractor, and life

3D-printing skin and bone so astronauts might heal themselves on missions

The first microchip valve powered by living cells

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have developed the first microchip valve powered by living cells. Earthworm muscle tissue allowed for a high contractile force that could be sustained for minutes, and unlike electrically controlled valves, did not require any external power source such as batteries. For several decades,

The first microchip valve powered by living cells

CRISPR-Cas9 modified T cells could solve immunotherapy problems

Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors The idea of genetically modifying a patient’s own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value.

CRISPR-Cas9 modified T cells could solve immunotherapy problems

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