Making pharma patents airtight

Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry. Building on recent work programming computers to identify synthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutically complex molecules, researchers in Poland and South Korea have unveiled computerized methods to suggest only synthetic strategies that bypass patent-protected aspects of

Making pharma patents airtight

The first self-curving cornea – 4D tissues

Scientists have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by moulding their surrounding material – initially creating the world’s first self-curving cornea The cornea is the clear outer layer at the front of the eye ball. In the research, a flat circle of gel containing corneal stromal cells (stem cells) was

The first self-curving cornea – 4D tissues

Nerve regeneration gets gene therapy help

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated

Nerve regeneration gets gene therapy help

Home-based hypertension program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a widespread clinical problem affecting nearly half of all adults. Despite the serious consequences that can result from hypertension, which puts patients at increased risk for

Home-based hypertension program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks

Turning waste methane into formaldehyde could be a big deal

The primary component of natural gas, methane, is itself a potent greenhouse gas. A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has unveiled a high performance catalyst for methane conversion to formaldehyde. This breakthrough has been led by Professor Kwang-jin Ahn and his team in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Ja Hun Kwak (School

Turning waste methane into formaldehyde could be a big deal

10 times more capacity for lithium ion batteries?

U of A chemists confirm importance of nano-sizing silicon to improve lithium ion batteries. University of Alberta chemists have taken a critical step toward creating a new generation of silicon-based lithium ion batteries with 10 times the charge capacity of current cells. “We wanted to test how different sizes of silicon nanoparticles could affect fracturing

10 times more capacity for lithium ion batteries?

New technology can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria More than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas, which is why access to clean water is one of the National Academy of Engineering’s Grand Challenges.

New technology can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes

Smart microrobots capable of adapting to their surroundings could deliver drugs

One day we may be able to ingest tiny robots that deliver drugs directly to diseased tissue, thanks to research being carried out at EPFL and ETH Zurich. The group of scientists – led by Selman Sakar at EPFL and Bradley Nelson at ETH Zurich – drew inspiration from bacteria to design smart, biocompatible microrobots that are highly flexible.

Smart microrobots capable of adapting to their surroundings could deliver drugs

Fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle which can ultimately lead to improved health

In a University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection against aging-associated diseases. The study was published recently in Cell Reports. The circadian clock operates within the body and its

Fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle which can ultimately lead to improved health

Transforming lighting technology and photovoltaics so you can paint them on

LED lights and monitors, and quality solar panels were born of a revolution in semiconductors that efficiently convert energy to light or vice versa. Now, next-generation semiconducting materials are on the horizon, and in a new study, researchers have uncovered eccentric physics behind their potential to transform lighting technology and photovoltaics yet again. Comparing the quantum properties of

Transforming lighting technology and photovoltaics so you can paint them on

New enzyme biomarker test has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives

Researchers at Queen’s have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives. The test, developed by scientists at the Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) at Queen’s, can detect enzyme markers of disease known as proteases in humans, animals

New enzyme biomarker test has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives

Artificially produced cells communicate with each other

Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins. Scientists around

Artificially produced cells communicate with each other

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