Artificial intelligence could speed the development of safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy for generating electricity

Artificial intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that is transforming scientific inquiry and industry, could now speed the development of safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy for generating electricity. A major step in this direction is under way at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University,

Artificial intelligence could speed the development of safe, clean and virtually limitless fusion energy for generating electricity

Refrigerators and air conditioners could run on an eco-friendly solid material instead of gases

Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners. Refrigeration and air conditioning currently devour a fifth of the energy produced worldwide, and demand for cooling is only going up. Xavier Moya When put under pressure, plastic crystals

Refrigerators and air conditioners could run on an eco-friendly solid material instead of gases

Scientists are a step closer to developing artificial lymph nodes that can spark T-cells to fight disease

In a proof-of-principle study in mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report the creation of a specialized gel that acts like a lymph node to successfully activate and multiply cancer-fighting immune system T-cells. The work puts scientists a step closer, they say, to injecting such artificial lymph nodes into people and sparking T-cells to fight

Scientists are a step closer to developing artificial lymph nodes that can spark T-cells to fight disease

Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells

Synthetic biologists add tunable, analog-to-digital converter to their toolkit Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells. The research, described online today in the journal Science, dramatically expands the chemical, physical and environmental cues engineers can use to prompt programmed responses from engineered organisms. Using a biochemical process called cooperative

Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells

New software tool combines supervised machine learning with digital signal processing to answer some fascinating questions

A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of a software tool that can provide conclusive answers to some of the world’s most fascinating questions. The tool, which combines supervised machine learning with digital signal processing (ML-DSP), could for the first time make it possible to definitively answer questions such as how many different

New software tool combines supervised machine learning with digital signal processing to answer some fascinating questions

If you need more energy storage just print it with MXene ink

Researchers from Drexel University and Trinity College in Ireland, have created ink for an inkjet printer from a highly conductive type of two-dimensional material called MXene. Recent findings, published in Nature Communications, suggest that the ink can be used to print flexible energy storage components, such as supercapacitors, in any size or shape. Conductive inks have

If you need more energy storage just print it with MXene ink

Analyzing sweat to diagnose diseases with a bandage-like biosensor

“Flexible and Superwettable Bands as a Platform toward Sweat Sampling and Sensing” Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what’s going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin’s surface, can be time-consuming and messy. Now, researchers have developed a bandage-like

Analyzing sweat to diagnose diseases with a bandage-like biosensor

Manufacturing of biobased plastics gets easier

A one-step method enables scalable and more environmentally friendly production of plant-derived plastic monomers, paving the way towards the mass production of a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based materials. An international team, including Kiyotaka Nakajima of Hokkaido University, Japan, and Emiel Hensen of Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands, has developed an energy-efficient method to synthesize

Manufacturing of biobased plastics gets easier

A new solar evaporator could make small-scale desalination more practical

A self-cleaning device made of wood aims to make small-scale desalination more practical About a billion people around the world lack access to safe drinking water. Desalinating salty water into drinkable water can help to fill this dangerous gap. But traditional desalination systems are far too expensive to install and operate in many locations, especially

A new solar evaporator could make small-scale desalination more practical

Biocomputers take a huge step towards reality

ETH researchers have integrated two CRISPR-Cas9-based core processors into human cells. This represents a huge step towards creating powerful biocomputers. Controlling gene expression through gene switches based on a model borrowed from the digital world has long been one of the primary objectives of synthetic biology. The digital technique uses what are known as logic

Biocomputers take a huge step towards reality

Faster computer programs possible with a novel data compression technique

Researchers free up more bandwidth by compressing “objects” within the memory hierarchy A novel technique developed by MIT researchers rethinks hardware data compression to free up more memory used by computers and mobile devices, allowing them to run faster and perform more tasks simultaneously. Data compression leverages redundant data to free up storage capacity, boost

Faster computer programs possible with a novel data compression technique

Animal-free chemical toxicity testing may become outdated with a new algorithm

With around 80,000 untested chemicals in use, Rutgers-led innovation addresses an urgent environmental safety need The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm developed by researchers at Rutgers and other universities. Toxicity testing – determining the amount of exposure to a chemical

Animal-free chemical toxicity testing may become outdated with a new algorithm

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