Bioinspired sustainable chemistry that breaks down even the most stubborn micropollutants

The 20th and 21st centuries have seen an explosion in the use of synthetic chemicals worldwide, including pesticides, medications and household cleaners — many of which end up in our waterways. Even in small amounts these substances can affect wildlife, plants and humans, and a number of them have shown resistance to normal water treatment methods,

Bioinspired sustainable chemistry that breaks down even the most stubborn micropollutants

Printable liquid devices from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots

Revolutionary material could lead to 3D-printable magnetic liquid devices for the fabrication of flexible electronics, or artificial cells that deliver targeted drug therapies to diseased cells Inventors of centuries past and scientists of today have found ingenious ways to make our lives better with magnets – from the magnetic needle on a compass to magnetic data

Printable liquid devices from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots

The search for extraterrestrial civilizations gains an important new tool

SCIPP physicist David Williams will help lead effort using four 12-meter telescopes to search for nanosecond flashes of light from extraterrestrial civilizations The Breakthrough Listen initiative to find signs of intelligent life in the universe will collaborate with the VERITAS Collaboration in the search for technosignatures, signs of technology developed by intelligent life beyond the Earth. Joining the Breakthrough Listen

The search for extraterrestrial civilizations gains an important new tool

Dermal tattoo sensors for the detection of blood pH change and metabolite levels

The Art of Sensing within the Skin The art of tattooing may have found a diagnostic twist. A team of scientists in Germany have developed permanent dermal sensors that can be applied as artistic tattoos. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a colorimetric analytic formulation was injected into the skin instead of tattoo ink. The

Dermal tattoo sensors for the detection of blood pH change and metabolite levels

DNA origami joins forces with molecular motors to build nanoscale machines

A new spin on DNA Every year, robots get more and more life-like. Solar-powered bees fly on lithe wings, humanoids stick backflips, and teams of soccer bots strategize how to dribble, pass, and score. The more researchers discover about how living creatures move, the more machines can imitate them all the way down to their smallest molecules. “We have these amazing machines

DNA origami joins forces with molecular motors to build nanoscale machines

Mimicking the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories

Electronic chip mimics the brain to make memories in a flash RMIT researchers drew inspiration from an emerging tool in biotechnology – optogenetics – to develop a device that replicates the way the brain stores and loses information. Optogenetics allows scientists to delve into the body’s electrical system with incredible precision, using light to manipulate

Mimicking the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories

A new non-invasive way of imaging the body and its organs using ultrasound

One day, scopes may no longer need to be inserted into the body, such as down the throat or under the skin, to reach the stomach, brain, or any other organs for examination. Maysam Chamanzar, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Matteo Giuseppe Scopelliti, an ECE Ph.D. student, have introduced a novel technique that

A new non-invasive way of imaging the body and its organs using ultrasound

The fastest quantum operation so far is 200 times faster than current technology

A group of physicists at UNSW Sydney have built a super-fast version of the central building block of a quantum computer. The research is the milestone result of a vision first outlined by scientists 20 years ago. A group of scientists led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons have achieved the first

The fastest quantum operation so far is 200 times faster than current technology

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