A set of modular hydrogel components that could be useful in a variety of soft robotic and biomedical applications

A new type of hydrogel material developed by Brown University researchers could soon make assembling complex microfluidic or soft robotic devices as simple as putting together a LEGO set. Using a new type of dual polymer material capable of responding dynamically to its environment, Brown University researchers have developed a set of modular hydrogel components

A set of modular hydrogel components that could be useful in a variety of soft robotic and biomedical applications

Amazon Echo and Google Home help during medical procedures in operating rooms

Research demonstrates value of Amazon Echo and Google Home during medical procedures Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. Smart speakers, such

Amazon Echo and Google Home help during medical procedures in operating rooms

New discovery may have profound implications for the architecture of solid-state quantum computers

At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. The discovery brings us a step closer to future applications of quantum information, as the tiny dots have to leave enough room on the microchip for delicate control electrodes. The distance between the dots has

New discovery may have profound implications for the architecture of solid-state quantum computers

A new mechanism of lifespan extension that links caloric restriction with immune system regulation

Joslin researchers show that caloric restriction lowers levels of innate immunity and inflammation, leading to increased longevity. Scientists have known for decades that caloric restriction leads to a longer lifespan. It has also been observed that chronic inflammation increases with age. But any relationship between the two had remained unexplored. But in a new study,

A new mechanism of lifespan extension that links caloric restriction with immune system regulation

Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases

Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. The study was posted in March on Gastroenterology, the online journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. Print publication is scheduled for July. While therapies have been available to treat some

Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases

Detecting radioactive material from afar

New method developed by UMD researchers could be scaled up to improve security at ports of entry Physicists at the University of Maryland have developed a powerful new method to detect radioactive material. By using an infrared laser beam to induce a phenomenon known as an electron avalanche breakdown near the material, the new technique

Detecting radioactive material from afar

Higher-density aviation biofuel made from plant waste and timber harvesting can increase aircraft range

Scientists in China have developed a process for converting plant waste from agriculture and timber harvesting into high-density aviation fuel. Their research, published March 21 in the journal Joule, may help reduce CO2 emissions from airplanes and rockets. Cellulose, the main component in the biofuel, is a cheap, renewable, and highly abundant polymer that forms the

Higher-density aviation biofuel made from plant waste and timber harvesting can increase aircraft range

4D printed shape programming materials can be as stiff as wood or as soft as a sponge

Rutgers engineers’ unique smart materials change shape as temperatures change Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineers have created flexible, lightweight materials with 4D printing that could lead to better shock absorption, morphing airplane or drone wings, soft robotics and tiny implantable biomedical devices. Their research is published in the journal Materials Horizons. 3D printing, also known as

4D printed shape programming materials can be as stiff as wood or as soft as a sponge

First inexpensive ankle exoskeleton that could be worn under clothes without restricting motion

A new lightweight, low-profile and inexpensive ankle exoskeleton could be widely used among elderly people, those with impaired lower-leg muscle strength and workers whose jobs require substantial walking or running. Developed by Vanderbilt mechanical engineers, the device is believed to be the first ankle exoskeleton that could be worn under clothes without restricting motion. It

First inexpensive ankle exoskeleton that could be worn under clothes without restricting motion

New monitor watches the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory

Sensor can monitor wiring in a building or ship, and signal when repairs are needed. A new system devised by researchers at MIT can monitor the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory, determining which ones are in use at any given time and whether any are showing signs of an

New monitor watches the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory

A new energy efficient process removes nearly all traces of oil in produced water

About 2.5 billion gallons of produced water, a byproduct from the oil refinery and extraction process, is generated each day in the United States. Handling that water is a major challenge in the oil refinery industry, particularly because it is deemed unusable for household and commercial use by the Environmental Protection Agency because of remaining contaminants. Several

A new energy efficient process removes nearly all traces of oil in produced water

An adhesive gel could repair injuries without surgery

An adhesive gel packed with light-activated chemicals can seal cuts or ulcers on the cornea —the clear surface of the eye — and then encourage the regeneration of corneal tissue, according to a preclinical study published online today in Science Advances. The new technology, named GelCORE (gel for corneal regeneration), could one day reduce the need for

An adhesive gel could repair injuries without surgery

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