Aug 162014
 
True2Form uses powerful mathematics to interpret artists’ strokes automatically lifting drawings off of the page. Credit: Image courtesy of University of Faculty of Science British Columbia

True2Form uses powerful mathematics to interpret artists’ strokes automatically lifting drawings off of the page.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Faculty of Science British Columbia

A novel graphics system that can infer complex 3D shapes from single professional sketches will be unveiled by UBC computer scientists at SIGGRAPH 2014 in Vancouver this week.

The solution has the potential to dramatically simplify how designers and artists develop new product ideas.

Converting an idea into a 3D model using current commercial tools is a complicated and painstaking process. So UBC researchers developed True2Form, a software algorithm inspired by the work of professional designers, who effectively communicate ideas through simple drawings.

“In line-drawings, designers and artists use descriptive curves and informative viewpoints to help viewers infer the complete shape of an object,” says UBC professor Alla Sheffer. “Our system mimics the results of human three-dimensional shape inference to turn a sketch curve network into 3D, while preserving fidelity to the original sketch.”

True2Form uses powerful mathematics to interpret the strokes that artists use in these drawings, automatically lifting drawings off the page. It produces convincing, complex 3D shapes computed from individual sketches, automatically corrected to account for inherent drawing inaccuracy.

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