Jul 312012
 

Prosthetic Implant Under Development

Thousands of veterans and warfighters returning to the U.S. suffer with limb amputations, and for many, standard prosthetics are not an option. Skin issues or short remaining-limb length can cause amputees to forgo the typical socket-type attachment systems.

A team of researchers and surgeons from the University of Utah and the George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Salt Lake City hope to provide an alternative solution via osseointegrated direct skeletal attachment of prosthetic limbs for these veterans and the many others with a similar condition. For the last six years, this team has been developing a device that can be implanted directly into a person’s residual bone, passing through the skin, so they can securely attach a prosthetic limb without the need for a socket.

“We are trying desperately to provide relief to the many veterans who have lost a limb,” says Roy Bloebaum, professor of orthopaedics at the University of Utah and the director of the VA Bone and Joint Research Lab. “Most of these people are very young and have many years to live. Our goal is to give them back all of the abilities they had before they were injured.”

Nothing like it has been done at a U.S. hospital, and the procedure has only been attempted an estimated 250 times worldwide in Europe and Australia, with mixed results.

Bloebaum is working with two other University of Utah professors — Kent Bachus, an engineer and a professor of orthopaedics and director of the Orthopaedic Research Lab at the university, and Peter Beck, an orthopaedic surgeon and adjunct professor of orthopaedics.

Their research recently hit two milestones. One was a partnership with DJO Surgical, a global developer, manufacturer and distributor of medical devices, which has licensed the implant technology and is assisting with the remaining research and development. The other milestone was being accepted into a new Food and Drug Administration program that allows them to design a human early feasibility study. DJO Surgical applied for the FDA study and is responsible for managing its implementation.

The early feasibility study will last up to three years. During that time, the clinical research team will implant their device into 10 patients. A unique element will be the ability to develop and refine their device between operations, which should accelerate the overall refinement process by compressing the development cycle.

“We have already addressed some of the major research challenges with osseointegrated implant devices” Bachus says.

Read more . . .

via Science Daily
 

The Latest Streaming News: Prosthetic Implant updated minute-by-minute

Bookmark this page and come back often
 

Latest NEWS

 

Latest VIDEO

 

The Latest from the BLOGOSPHERE

Other Interesting Posts

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: