Jun 132011
 
DNA can act like Velcro for nanoparticles

Image by Argonne National Laboratory via Flickr

Researchers from the University of Hull have discovered a way to load up nanoparticles with large numbers of light-sensitive molecules to create a more effective form of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating cancer.

Photodynamic therapy uses molecules which, when irradiated with light, cause irreparable damage to cells by creating toxic forms of oxygen, called reactive oxygen species. Most PDT works with individual light-sensitive molecules — but the new nanoparticles could each carry hundreds of molecules to a cancer site.

A number of different light-sensitive molecules — collectively known as photosensitisers — are used in PDT and each absorbs a very specific part of the light spectrum. The research team — from the University of Hull’s Department of Chemistry — placed one kind of photosensitiser inside each nanoparticle and another on the outside, which meant that far more reactive oxygen species could be created from the same amount of light. The findings are published in the current issue of Molecular Pharmaceutics.

The nanoparticles have also been designed to be the perfect size and shape to penetrate easily into the tumour, as lead researcher, Dr Ross Boyle, explains.

“Small cancer tumours get nutrients and oxygen by diffusion, but once tumours reach a certain size, they need to create blood vessels to continue growing, ” he says. “These new blood vessels, or neovasculature, are ‘leaky’ because the vessel walls are not as tightly knit as normal blood vessels. Our nanoparticles have been designed so the pressure in the blood vessels will push them through the space between the cells to get into the tumour tissue.”

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